Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Sanctuary, Congo: Meet a Jane Goodall Institute Ranger

Tchimpounga Rangers look at map

Tchimpounga’s rangers during a routine patrol of Tchimpounga Nature Reserve. © Fernando Turmo

“IT IS THE MISSING PIECE OF THE PUZZLE IN CONSERVATION, PROTECTING ENDANGERED SPECIES AND NATURE ITSELF. WE MUST ALL COME TOGETHER TO ENSURE WE PROTECT THE RANGERS THEMSELVES ON THE FRONT LINE.”

–DR. JANE GOODALL

Every day, park rangers risk their lives to protect wildlife and wild places from poaching and other threats. Sadly, it’s estimated that over 1,000 park rangers have been killed in the line of duty over the past 10 years. A large percentage of these are due to commercial poachers and armed militia groups. Park rangers are generally under-equipped, underpaid, and often under-appreciated. We think they are heroes.

Becoming a park ranger is no easy feat, Their tasks are multifaceted and include a HUGE range of not only dangers and hazards, but they quite literally put their life on the line every day to ensure the safety of some of our most treasured wildlife. Rangers are real life super heroes, and their work is only possible thanks to generous donors like you.

EARTH WARRIORS

Getting there is not a job for the faint hearted. Many of the Jane Goodall Institute Rangers are the ‘boots on the ground’ in Africa’s protected areas. Including Tchimpounga.

These rangers are in charge of undertaking rigorous patrols of law enforcement and wildlife monitoring, community engagement and conservation management activities. It takes a unique type of individual to perform tasks expected of a park ranger in what are often extreme conditions. Due to the physical nature of the job, a high level of fitness and of course strength is required.

Our friends and partners at the Thin Green Line Foundation know firsthand just how gruelling this onboarding can be. Sean Wilmore, President of the International Ranger Federation, Founder of The Thin Green Line Foundation and our Park Ranger program, has worked closely and tirelessly in a joint effort with the Jane Goodall Institute rangers to oversee and ensure a longstanding protection program is in place for chimpanzees across Tchimpounga.

Donate to Chimp Guardian here >>

 

“RANGERS ARE THE MISSING LINK IN CONSERVATION. ”

–DR. JANE GOODALL

Some of the below may be confronting for some readers. Reader discretion is advised due to some difficult subject matters.

Deo, a young chimpanzee, was kept in a cage when rescuers found her

Tragically 75 per cent of rangers have been killed since 2016 as a direct result of poaching and wildlife trafficking, many murdered by the poachers that they were attempting to stop.

The Jane Goodall Institute has a long history with rangers and relies on these strong allies to keep our conservation initiatives functioning and progressing. In our many protected areas of research and conservation throughout Africa, we depend on rangers for many things, including:

• Resource protection/management
• Public safety
• Patrolling grounds
• Enforcing regulations
• Conducting investigations
• Performing search and rescues
• Assistance in medical emergencies
• And arguably most imperatively: Preventing wildlife poaching

THE FRONT LINE OF FIGHTING EXTINCTION

In the Congo Basin poachers kill thousands of chimps as a part of the illegal bushmeat trade, allowing only the smallest to live to be sold off as pets. The animal lives saved is an enormous figure directly thanks to the work of rangers preventing these poachers from succeeding. Without these protectors, endangered species like chimpanzees may be gone from this world forever.

Tchimpounga Park Rangers meeting the new Park Conservator Mr. Mpika. They are wearing masks during the Covid Pandemic.

You may have heard of the term ‘wildlife trafficking,’ in the context of graphic imagery of elephants being brutally murdered for their tusks, or piles and piles of the fins of sharks drying on the concrete.

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